Cheap Travel Insurance For People With Myasthenia Gravis

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With myasthenia gravis you really should take travel insurance out when you go on holiday or travel abroad just in case you fall ill and need medical treatment as the NHS will not provide treatment whilst you are on holiday. The cost of receiving medical treatment outside the UK can be very expensive and the travel insurance will repay most of these costs provided you took it out before you left for your holiday.

In addition if you need assistance to get home, like an ambulance or medical staff to accompany you, then the travel insurance will pay for the costs associated with repatriation too.

For those with pre-existing medical conditions travel insurance can be expensive unless you shop around (this link might help you find cheap travel insurance for people with myasthenia gravis).

Travellers with myasthenia gravis have in the past paid significantly more for their travel insurance as those with myasthenia gravis, like many other sufferers of a pre-existing condition have had their premiums raised. The travel insurance companies consider those that are under the treatment of a doctor, even on a routine basis, may be more likely to claim and hence cause them to have to pay out.

Additional rating factors which effect travel insurance are connected conditions and whether this condition has caused you to cut short or cancel a holiday in the past.

Myasthenia gravis and travel insurance

Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune neuromuscular disease leading to fluctuating muscle weakness and fatigue. Muscle weakness is caused by circulating antibodies that block acetylcholine receptors at the postsynaptic neuromuscular junction, inhibiting the excitatory effects of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine on nicotinic receptors at neuromuscular junctions.

Myasthenia is treated medically with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors or immunosuppressants, and, in selected cases, thymectomy. The disease incidence is 3–30 cases per million per year and rising as a result of increased awareness. MG must be distinguished from congenital myasthenic syndromes that can present similar symptoms but do not respond to immunosuppressive treatments.

Classification The most widely accepted classification of myasthenia gravis is the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America Clinical Classification:
  • Class I: Any eye muscle weakness, possible ptosis, no other evidence of muscle weakness elsewhere
  • Class II: Eye muscle weakness of any severity, mild weakness of other muscles
    • Class Iia: Predominantly limb or axial muscles
    • Class Iib: Predominantly bulbar and/or respiratory muscles
  • Class III: Eye muscle weakness of any severity, moderate weakness of other muscles
    • Class IIIa: Predominantly limb or axial muscles
    • Class IIIb: Predominantly bulbar and/or respiratory muscles
  • Class IV: Eye muscle weakness of any severity, severe weakness of other muscles
    • Class Iva: Predominantly limb or axial muscles
    • Class Ivb: Predominantly bulbar and/or respiratory muscles (Can also include feeding tube without intubation)
  • Class V: Intubation needed to maintain airway
Signs and symptoms The hallmark of myasthenia gravis is fatigability. Muscles become progressively weaker during periods of activity and improve after periods of rest. Muscles that control eye and eyelid movement, facial expressions, chewing, talking, and swallowing are especially susceptible. The muscles that control breathing and neck and limb movements can also be affected.

All of these factors will be taken into account when you apply for travel insurance with myasthenia gravis.

In addition, those that are waiting for a diagnosis or additional tests face the highest premiums as what insurers’ hate most of all is uncertainty, especially around the possible risk of falling ill abroad with a condition that isn’t yet well controlled.